Mobile Storytelling

20 Sep

Today I saw this article on mobile storytelling ventures in London. Apps like Twitter and Facebook are all about telling stories, real-life stories, so it is only natural that there should also be apps to help people make, restructure and share fiction.

People buy and use mobile storytelling and reading apps (like Kindle, iBooks and eMobo and its companion website textnovel.com) to entertain themselves while trapped on public transit, sitting in traffic or standing in line. It falls in the same tradition of Arabian Nights or The Iliad, telling stories to pass the time, entertain and keep the monsters at bay.

While textnovel.com is fairly straightforward: an author creates a story and disseminates it, readers can download on mobile apps or read online, this app, Tiny Games by Hide and Seek, makes writing and reading into a local-centric game, slicing and re-structuring “story” to include local information, a social aspect and good, old-fashioned creativity to create a brand new narrative.

Also recently created, also in London, is an app called Me Books specifically for creating interactivity with children’s’ picture books.  It allows children to select with their finger the part of the story/picture they like best and record narration of their own. Licensing from traditional publishers for conversion to this digital medium was difficult, and an issue I anticipate will continue as digitization of traditional books continues. However, as digital publishing expands and becomes norm, these licensing issues will decrease.

Sources:

Tiny Games App by Hide&Seek: http://publishingperspectives.com/2013/09/mobile-storytelling-inspires-innovation-experimentation/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+PublishingPerspectives+%28Publishing+Perspectives%29

Me Books: http://www.madeinme.com/me-books/

Advertisements

One Response to “Mobile Storytelling”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Jaded Ibis Productions, A Recap | Exploration in Digital Publishing Innovations - November 12, 2013

    […] Also, as mentioned in this blog, there is the advent of augmented reality storytelling and mobile storytelling. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: